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Jeff Patton

Chief Trouble Maker

Jeff Patton and Associates

United States

Jeff Patton helps companies adopt a way of working that’s focused on building great products, not just building stuff faster. Jeff blends a mixture of Agile thinking, Lean and Lean Startup Thinking, and UX Design and Design Thinking to end up with a holistic product-centric way of working. Jeff is author of the bestselling O’Reilly book User Story Mapping which describes a simple holistic approach to using stories in Agile development without losing sight of the big picture. You can learn more about Jeff at: jpattonassociates.com.

Talks at YOW!

Keynote - MVP: and Why We Confuse Building to Learn with Building to Earn - YOW! Hong Kong 2018

Minimum viable product is one of the most misunderstood, misused, and abused terms in contemporary software development. In this talk Jeff will explain the misunderstandings made by thought leaders that lead to confusion we all deal with today. You’ll learn the counter-intuitive concepts hidden in the term and why really using them is so hard. You’ll learn about techniques that will ultimately help you find smaller successful releases, test your ideas faster, develop higher quality software more predictably, and release more confidently than ever before. Because hidden in this nasty little term are clues that can help you do all that.

Read More

Passionate Product Ownership: A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop - YOW! Hong Kong 2018

Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization. If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders...There’s hope!

The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

Read More

Keynote - MVP: and Why We Confuse Building to Learn with Building to Earn - YOW! Singapore 2018

Minimum viable product is one of the most misunderstood, misused, and abused terms in contemporary software development. In this talk Jeff will explain the misunderstandings made by thought leaders that lead to confusion we all deal with today. You’ll learn the counter-intuitive concepts hidden in the term and why really using them is so hard. You’ll learn about techniques that will ultimately help you find smaller successful releases, test your ideas faster, develop higher quality software more predictably, and release more confidently than ever before. Because hidden in this nasty little term are clues that can help you do all that.

Read More

Passionate Product Ownership: A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop - YOW! Singapore 2018

Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization. If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders...There’s hope!

The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

Read More

Keynote - MVP: and Why We Confuse Building to Learn with Building to Earn - YOW! Perth 2018

Minimum viable product is one of the most misunderstood, misused, and abused terms in contemporary software development. In this talk Jeff will explain the misunderstandings made by thought leaders that lead to confusion we all deal with today. You’ll learn the counter-intuitive concepts hidden in the term and why really using them is so hard. You’ll learn about techniques that will ultimately help you find smaller successful releases, test your ideas faster, develop higher quality software more predictably, and release more confidently than ever before. Because hidden in this nasty little term are clues that can help you do all that.

Read More

Passionate Product Ownership: A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop - YOW! Perth 2018

Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization. If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders...There’s hope!

The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

Read More

How Agile Screwed Up Product Ownership, and 5 Things You Can Do to Fix It - YOW! 2017 Sydney

Agile development has fixed lots of problems in software development, Companies using it consistently deliver working software more predictably than ever before, But, the software they make isn’t necessarily better, or more successful in the market. Because the things we need to do to make a product successful aren’t baked into agile development,. And, in fact, strict adherence to common agile practice can result in even worse products.

This talk explains why and gives you 5 concrete changes to Agile development you can make to improve things. These aren’t things your product owner or product manager must do. They’re the things the whole team need to do. And, they’re not easy things. But, they’re necessary if you want to more consistently make products people love.

Read More

Passionate Product Ownership: A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop - YOW! 2017 Sydney

Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization. If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders...There’s hope!

The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

Read More

How Agile Screwed Up Product Ownership, and 5 Things You Can Do to Fix It - YOW! 2017 Brisbane

Agile development has fixed lots of problems in software development, Companies using it consistently deliver working software more predictably than ever before, But, the software they make isn’t necessarily better, or more successful in the market. Because the things we need to do to make a product successful aren’t baked into agile development,. And, in fact, strict adherence to common agile practice can result in even worse products.

This talk explains why and gives you 5 concrete changes to Agile development you can make to improve things. These aren’t things your product owner or product manager must do. They’re the things the whole team need to do. And, they’re not easy things. But, they’re necessary if you want to more consistently make products people love.

Read More

How Agile Screwed Up Product Ownership, and 5 Things You Can Do to Fix It - YOW! 2017 Melbourne

Agile development has fixed lots of problems in software development, Companies using it consistently deliver working software more predictably than ever before, But, the software they make isn’t necessarily better, or more successful in the market. Because the things we need to do to make a product successful aren’t baked into agile development,. And, in fact, strict adherence to common agile practice can result in even worse products.

This talk explains why and gives you 5 concrete changes to Agile development you can make to improve things. These aren’t things your product owner or product manager must do. They’re the things the whole team need to do. And, they’re not easy things. But, they’re necessary if you want to more consistently make products people love.

Read More

Passionate Product Ownership: A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop - YOW! 2017 Melbourne

Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization. If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders...There’s hope!

The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

Read More

Collaborating Better with Story Maps - YOW! 2014 Sydney

Product design documents are like vacation photos. They help the people that were there relive and recall details, but fail to give people who weren’t there the same amount or quality of information. Effective teams know how to collaborate for shared understanding. In this talk, I’ll show how Agile stories and story mapping help everyone on the team work together to understand the problem space and design and validate products more effectively.

Read More

Collaborating Better with Story Maps - YOW! 2014 Brisbane

Product design documents are like vacation photos. They help the people that were there relive and recall details, but fail to give people who weren’t there the same amount or quality of information. Effective teams know how to collaborate for shared understanding. In this talk, I’ll show how Agile stories and story mapping help everyone on the team work together to understand the problem space and design and validate products more effectively.

Read More

Collaborating Better with Story Maps - YOW! 2014 Melbourne

Product design documents are like vacation photos. They help the people that were there relive and recall details, but fail to give people who weren’t there the same amount or quality of information. Effective teams know how to collaborate for shared understanding. In this talk, I’ll show how Agile stories and story mapping help everyone on the team work together to understand the problem space and design and validate products more effectively.

Read More

Safety Not Guaranteed: How Successful Teams Ignore the Rules to Create Successful Products - YOW! 2013 Brisbane

If you’re looking for simple solutions for building successful products, you won’t find them in this talk. This is the talk about how hard it really is to succeed, and how the best way to succeed is to ignore the best practice and avoid playing it safe.

In this talk, you’ll hear about companies that started with the best of intentions. But in the end, deliberately broke their process and learned a few counter-intuitive things along the way: The most user-centric companies learned to lie to their customers, skip research, trust their guesses, and stop worrying about usability. The most agile companies learned to deliberately ship bad code, and to stop planning more than a few hours in advance. Design Thinking advocates adopted Lean Startup thinking. And, Lean Startup advocates adopted Design Thinking. In the end the most successful companies end up with a process soup that’s not true to any single process style, and definitely not simple to explain to anyone. They learned that to really win the product development game, they’ve got to worry a lot less about safely delivering on time.

If you attend, you might end up with a few clever ideas to try in your organization. But what I hope you take away is a willingness to abandon the false security of any process approach, keep the best ideas and abandon the rest to focus on succeeding in spite of your process.

Read More

Safety Not Guaranteed: How Successful Teams Ignore the Rules to Create Successful Products - YOW! 2013 Sydney

If you’re looking for simple solutions for building successful products, you won’t find them in this talk. This is the talk about how hard it really is to succeed, and how the best way to succeed is to ignore the best practice and avoid playing it safe.

In this talk, you’ll hear about companies that started with the best of intentions. But in the end, deliberately broke their process and learned a few counter-intuitive things along the way: The most user-centric companies learned to lie to their customers, skip research, trust their guesses, and stop worrying about usability. The most agile companies learned to deliberately ship bad code, and to stop planning more than a few hours in advance. Design Thinking advocates adopted Lean Startup thinking. And, Lean Startup advocates adopted Design Thinking. In the end the most successful companies end up with a process soup that’s not true to any single process style, and definitely not simple to explain to anyone. They learned that to really win the product development game, they’ve got to worry a lot less about safely delivering on time.

If you attend, you might end up with a few clever ideas to try in your organization. But what I hope you take away is a willingness to abandon the false security of any process approach, keep the best ideas and abandon the rest to focus on succeeding in spite of your process.

Read More

Safety Not Guaranteed: How Successful Teams Ignore the Rules to Create Successful Products - YOW! 2013 Melbourne

If you’re looking for simple solutions for building successful products, you won’t find them in this talk. This is the talk about how hard it really is to succeed, and how the best way to succeed is to ignore the best practice and avoid playing it safe.

In this talk, you’ll hear about companies that started with the best of intentions. But in the end, deliberately broke their process and learned a few counter-intuitive things along the way: The most user-centric companies learned to lie to their customers, skip research, trust their guesses, and stop worrying about usability. The most agile companies learned to deliberately ship bad code, and to stop planning more than a few hours in advance. Design Thinking advocates adopted Lean Startup thinking. And, Lean Startup advocates adopted Design Thinking. In the end the most successful companies end up with a process soup that’s not true to any single process style, and definitely not simple to explain to anyone. They learned that to really win the product development game, they’ve got to worry a lot less about safely delivering on time.

If you attend, you might end up with a few clever ideas to try in your organization. But what I hope you take away is a willingness to abandon the false security of any process approach, keep the best ideas and abandon the rest to focus on succeeding in spite of your process.

Read More

Co-making Great Products - YOW! 2012 Sydney

Mediocrity guaranteed. This sad tagline describes most of the processes we use today including typical agile process. It’s easy to see why. Software development’s an expensive risky business. To deal with the risk, the players involved adopt a client-vendor model where those in the client role give requirements and those in the vendor role estimate time and effort and agree to build what’s asked for. In this model we clearly separate responsibilities so that we know who’s accountable when things go wrong. Although we know things rarely go as planned, and innovative ideas rarely spring from such a relationship, we continue to work in processes where treating our coworkers as outsourced vendors is considered best practice and risking everything on the ideas of a select few isn’t regarded as risky.

This talk is about an alternative way of working.

In this talk Jeff explores companies beginning to adopt a style of working where everyone in the organization gets involved with identifying and solving problems. You’ll hear examples from real companies describing their practices for learning first-hand about customers and users, practices for collaboratively designing solutions for the problems found in the real world, and approaches to learning if what we created really benefited anyone. This new style of work is a process cocktail combining the best of agile development, lean software development and lean startup, user-centered design, and collaborative design thinking.

This style of work isn’t the traditional client-vendor model where knowing who’s to blame is the primary concern. It’s a co-making style of work where everyone brings their skills and experience to the table and together takes ownership for making great things.

Read More

Co-making Great Products - YOW! 2012 Brisbane

Mediocrity guaranteed. This sad tagline describes most of the processes we use today including typical agile process. It’s easy to see why. Software development’s an expensive risky business. To deal with the risk, the players involved adopt a client-vendor model where those in the client role give requirements and those in the vendor role estimate time and effort and agree to build what’s asked for. In this model we clearly separate responsibilities so that we know who’s accountable when things go wrong. Although we know things rarely go as planned, and innovative ideas rarely spring from such a relationship, we continue to work in processes where treating our coworkers as outsourced vendors is considered best practice and risking everything on the ideas of a select few isn’t regarded as risky.

This talk is about an alternative way of working.

In this talk Jeff explores companies beginning to adopt a style of working where everyone in the organization gets involved with identifying and solving problems. You’ll hear examples from real companies describing their practices for learning first-hand about customers and users, practices for collaboratively designing solutions for the problems found in the real world, and approaches to learning if what we created really benefited anyone. This new style of work is a process cocktail combining the best of agile development, lean software development and lean startup, user-centered design, and collaborative design thinking.

This style of work isn’t the traditional client-vendor model where knowing who’s to blame is the primary concern. It’s a co-making style of work where everyone brings their skills and experience to the table and together takes ownership for making great things.

Read More

Co-making Great Products - YOW! 2012 Melbourne

Mediocrity guaranteed. This sad tagline describes most of the processes we use today including typical agile process. It’s easy to see why. Software development’s an expensive risky business. To deal with the risk, the players involved adopt a client-vendor model where those in the client role give requirements and those in the vendor role estimate time and effort and agree to build what’s asked for. In this model we clearly separate responsibilities so that we know who’s accountable when things go wrong. Although we know things rarely go as planned, and innovative ideas rarely spring from such a relationship, we continue to work in processes where treating our coworkers as outsourced vendors is considered best practice and risking everything on the ideas of a select few isn’t regarded as risky.

This talk is about an alternative way of working.

In this talk Jeff explores companies beginning to adopt a style of working where everyone in the organization gets involved with identifying and solving problems. You’ll hear examples from real companies describing their practices for learning first-hand about customers and users, practices for collaboratively designing solutions for the problems found in the real world, and approaches to learning if what we created really benefited anyone. This new style of work is a process cocktail combining the best of agile development, lean software development and lean startup, user-centered design, and collaborative design thinking.

This style of work isn’t the traditional client-vendor model where knowing who’s to blame is the primary concern. It’s a co-making style of work where everyone brings their skills and experience to the table and together takes ownership for making great things.

Read More

Passionate Product Ownership A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop (Sydney) -

Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization.
If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders…There’s hope!

The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

Read More

Passionate Product Ownership A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop (Melbourne) -

Jeff Patton will be back in Australia September 30 - October 10 conducting his two-day CSPO Passionate Product Owner workshops. If you're interested in hosting a private workshop in-house, please contact [email protected].

Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization.
If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders…There’s hope!

The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

Read More

Passionate Product Ownership A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop (Sydney) -

Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization.
If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders…There’s hope!

The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

Read More

The game has changed (Sydney) - YOW! Night

We all know how fast technology changes. But, we sometimes fail to understand how fast our process needs to change to keep up. This talk is about how 21st century software development has thrown out most of the process assumptions you might have originally learned. Jeff Patton will explain how Product Thinking, Lean Startup Thinking, and Continuous Delivery have fundamentally changed how we design and build software.

Read More