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Fred George

Consultant

Fred George Consulting

United States

Fred George is an active industry consultant, and has been writing code for nearly 50 years in (by his count) over 75 languages. He has delivered projects and products across his career, and in the last decade alone, has worked in the US, India, China, and the UK. An early adopter of new technologies, Fred continues to impact the industry with his leading­-edge ideas, advocating Micro­Service Architectures since 2005 and flat team structures (under the moniker of Programmer Anarchy). He travels the globe speaking and consulting on these topics. Oh, and he still writes code!

Talks at YOW!

IoT and MicroServices - YOW! Singapore 2017

IoT, the prevalence of specialized interconnected devices, has invaded business and home. The myriad of devices, hubs, and APIs has created a Tower of Babel that makes the Android phone scene seem mild. Such devices are inherently less network ­reliable than previous products, primarily due to the casual attachment (convenient outlets). Add to this heterogeneous soup the security exposure that has already been exploited in DDoS attacks, and you have an environment begging for technical solutions.

We propose Asynchronous MicroServices as a solution. Borrowing a page from historical J2ME thinking and more recent implementations using IFTTT, we introduce small bridging MicroServices for the various devices. Further, also consistent with MicroServices, we keep these services very simple: They broadcast device status to an event bus, or listen for action commands to relay to the devices from the same bus. Interaction among the various IoT devices is delegated to yet another set of MicroServices.

One exemplary composite application would accept signals from motion detectors to turn on appropriate lights, or alternatively alerting the owner of unauthorized intrusion. Using the same motion detectors, lights can be dimmed and eventually turned off. Room temperatures and even audio/video gear could be adjusted as well. Using Asynchronous MicroServices, we can also set up controlled access from the outside world, rather than exposing each device with its own vulnerabilities.

Finally we wrap up talking about the challenges of implementing this in my own flat using Hue lights, Amazon Alexa, and 4th generation Apple TV. We run these MicroServices in local containers attached to the same home network. Docker support of ARM devices enables low cost redundancy as well.

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Microservices - Let's Build Some (V2) - YOW! Singapore 2017

RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

While “micro-services” is becoming a heavily over-worked term, it has been interpreted many ways. In this hands-on workshop we will explore a particular style, tiny asynchronous services, that was the core of one of the most successful implementations.

WHAT WILL I LEARN

Given an animated specification of flow, we will embark on delivering the proposed services, wrestling with the issues common to this new paradigm. Participants have a choice of languages, with new starting code in Java, C#, and Ruby. At the end of the workshop, we will discuss MicroServices challenges and organizations that are optimized for such architectures.

RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

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IoT and MicroServices - YOW! Hong Kong 2017

IoT, the prevalence of specialized interconnected devices, has invaded business and home. The myriad of devices, hubs, and APIs has created a Tower of Babel that makes the Android phone scene seem mild. Such devices are inherently less network ­reliable than previous products, primarily due to the casual attachment (convenient outlets). Add to this heterogeneous soup the security exposure that has already been exploited in DDoS attacks, and you have an environment begging for technical solutions.

We propose Asynchronous MicroServices as a solution. Borrowing a page from historical J2ME thinking and more recent implementations using IFTTT, we introduce small bridging MicroServices for the various devices. Further, also consistent with MicroServices, we keep these services very simple: They broadcast device status to an event bus, or listen for action commands to relay to the devices from the same bus. Interaction among the various IoT devices is delegated to yet another set of MicroServices.

One exemplary composite application would accept signals from motion detectors to turn on appropriate lights, or alternatively alerting the owner of unauthorized intrusion. Using the same motion detectors, lights can be dimmed and eventually turned off. Room temperatures and even audio/video gear could be adjusted as well. Using Asynchronous MicroServices, we can also set up controlled access from the outside world, rather than exposing each device with its own vulnerabilities.

Finally we wrap up talking about the challenges of implementing this in my own flat using Hue lights, Amazon Alexa, and 4th generation Apple TV. We run these MicroServices in local containers attached to the same home network. Docker support of ARM devices enables low cost redundancy as well.

Read More

Implementation of MicroService Architecture - YOW! 2014 Sydney

MicroService Architectures has debuted on the ThoughtWorks Technology Radar as the first technology they address, and with strong recommendations to immediately experiment. In this talk, we will outline the guidelines we have used at two different companies to implement MicroServices. And more importantly, we will tell you about the pitfalls we have encountered.

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Implementation of MicroService Architecture - YOW! 2014 Brisbane

MicroService Architectures has debuted on the ThoughtWorks Technology Radar as the first technology they address, and with strong recommendations to immediately experiment. In this talk, we will outline the guidelines we have used at two different companies to implement MicroServices. And more importantly, we will tell you about the pitfalls we have encountered.

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Implementation of MicroService Architecture - YOW! 2014 Melbourne

MicroService Architectures has debuted on the ThoughtWorks Technology Radar as the first technology they address, and with strong recommendations to immediately experiment. In this talk, we will outline the guidelines we have used at two different companies to implement MicroServices. And more importantly, we will tell you about the pitfalls we have encountered.

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Programmer Anarchy - YOW! 2012 Sydney

The Agile movement shifted the relationship between clients and developers in a profound way. In waterfall processes, clients specified large amounts of functionality, then nervously faded into the background until the fateful day-of-delivery. With Agile, developers strove to engage with clients continuously, and delivered much more frequently against their needs. A new trust was established. At the Forward Internet Group in London, we are implementing a second major shift between clients and developers. The trust of the clients in developers evolves into a broader trust of the developers to deliver business value without resorting to a series of well-defined stories. In essence, the business has empowered the developers to do what they think is right for the business. This model, popularized by Facebook, has several labels, but the one we prefer for our flavor is Programmer Anarchy.

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Programmer Anarchy - YOW! 2012 Brisbane

The Agile movement shifted the relationship between clients and developers in a profound way. In waterfall processes, clients specified large amounts of functionality, then nervously faded into the background until the fateful day-of-delivery. With Agile, developers strove to engage with clients continuously, and delivered much more frequently against their needs. A new trust was established. At the Forward Internet Group in London, we are implementing a second major shift between clients and developers. The trust of the clients in developers evolves into a broader trust of the developers to deliver business value without resorting to a series of well-defined stories. In essence, the business has empowered the developers to do what they think is right for the business. This model, popularized by Facebook, has several labels, but the one we prefer for our flavor is Programmer Anarchy.

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Programmer Anarchy - YOW! 2012 Melbourne

The Agile movement shifted the relationship between clients and developers in a profound way. In waterfall processes, clients specified large amounts of functionality, then nervously faded into the background until the fateful day-of-delivery. With Agile, developers strove to engage with clients continuously, and delivered much more frequently against their needs. A new trust was established. At the Forward Internet Group in London, we are implementing a second major shift between clients and developers. The trust of the clients in developers evolves into a broader trust of the developers to deliver business value without resorting to a series of well-defined stories. In essence, the business has empowered the developers to do what they think is right for the business. This model, popularized by Facebook, has several labels, but the one we prefer for our flavor is Programmer Anarchy.

Read More