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Edward Kmett

Chair of the Haskell Core Libraries Committee, Software Engineering Lead

Senior Software Engineer at Digital Asset

United States

Edward spent most of his adult life trying to build reusable code in imperative languages before realizing he was building castles in sand. He converted to Haskell in 2006 while searching for better building materials. He now chairs the Haskell core libraries committee, collaborates with hundreds of other developers on over 150 projects on github, builds tools for quants and traders using the purely-functional programming-language Ermine for S&P Capital IQ, and is obsessed with finding better tools so that seven years from now he won’t be stuck solving the same problems with the same tools he was stuck using seven years ago.

Talks at YOW!

Logic Programming à la Carte - YOW! Lambda Jam 2019

I've been working on a logic programming framework in Haskell, called guanxi (關係) with an eye towards scalability. To build it I leaned heavily on my previous work on propagators and a bunch of other little bits and pieces of algebra and category theory in the design process. A number of patterns have arisen repeatedly throughout the process of building this library. I'll give a tour through the current state of guanxi and try to extract some of the more reusable bits of its design for your inspection.
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Let's Lens - YOW! Lambda Jam 2019

Let's Lens presents a series of exercises, in a similar format to the Data61 functional programming course material. The subject of the exercises is around the concept of lenses, initially proposed by Foster et al., to solve the view-update problem of relational databases.

The theories around lenses have been advanced significantly in recent years, resulting in a library, implemented in Haskell, called lens.

This workshop will take you through the basic definition of the lens data structure and its related structures such as traversals and prisms. Following this we implement some of the low-level lens library, then go on to discuss and solve a practical problem that uses all of these structures.

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Combinators Revisited - YOW! Lambda Jam 2018

Back in the 80's, one approach to compiling functional programming languages was to compile down to combinators such as SKI. John Hughes' initial work on supercombinators changed the way folks thought about compiling functional languages and caused folks to turn away from this approach by customizing the combinator set to your particular program. Then Lennart Augustsson's work on implementing supercombinators more efficiently sealed the deal. GHC's compilation technique is a descendant of this school of thought.
But what did we give up to get to where we are? Let's explore a bit of alternate history.
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Functionally Oblivious and Succinct - YOW! 2014 Sydney

This talk provides a whirlwind tour of some new types of functional data structures and their applications.

Cache-oblivious algorithms let us perform optimally for all cache levels in your system at the same time by optimizing for one cache for which we don’t know the parameters. While Okasaki’s “Purely Functional Data Structures” taught us how to reason about asymptotic performance in a lazy language like Haskell, reasoning about cache-oblivious algorithms requires some new techniques.

Succinct data structures let us work directly on near-optimally compressed data representations without decompressing.

How can derive new functional data structures from these techniques? Applications include just diverse areas as speeding up something like Haskell’s venerable Data.Map, handling “big data” on disk without tuning for hardware, and parsing JSON faster in less memory.

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Functionally Oblivious and Succinct - YOW! 2014 Brisbane

This talk provides a whirlwind tour of some new types of functional data structures and their applications.

Cache-oblivious algorithms let us perform optimally for all cache levels in your system at the same time by optimizing for one cache for which we don’t know the parameters. While Okasaki’s “Purely Functional Data Structures” taught us how to reason about asymptotic performance in a lazy language like Haskell, reasoning about cache-oblivious algorithms requires some new techniques.

Succinct data structures let us work directly on near-optimally compressed data representations without decompressing.

How can derive new functional data structures from these techniques? Applications include just diverse areas as speeding up something like Haskell’s venerable Data.Map, handling “big data” on disk without tuning for hardware, and parsing JSON faster in less memory.

Read More

Functionally Oblivious and Succinct - YOW! 2014 Melbourne

This talk provides a whirlwind tour of some new types of functional data structures and their applications.

Cache-oblivious algorithms let us perform optimally for all cache levels in your system at the same time by optimizing for one cache for which we don’t know the parameters. While Okasaki’s “Purely Functional Data Structures” taught us how to reason about asymptotic performance in a lazy language like Haskell, reasoning about cache-oblivious algorithms requires some new techniques.

Succinct data structures let us work directly on near-optimally compressed data representations without decompressing.

How can derive new functional data structures from these techniques? Applications include just diverse areas as speeding up something like Haskell’s venerable Data.Map, handling “big data” on disk without tuning for hardware, and parsing JSON faster in less memory.

Read More

Let's Lens - YOW! Lambda Jam 2018

Let's Lens presents a series of exercises, in a similar format to the Data61 functional programming course material. The subject of the exercises is around the concept of lenses, initially proposed by Foster et al., to solve the view-update problem of relational databases.

The theories around lenses have been advanced significantly in recent years, resulting in a library, implemented in Haskell, called lens.

This workshop will take you through the basic definition of the lens data structure and its related structures such as traversals and prisms. Following this we implement some of the low-level lens library, then go on to discuss and solve a practical problem that uses all of these structures.

Read More